Timeline 3B – Chinese in the Postdiluvian Era’s late phase

by John Holbrook Jr.
A Biblical View, posted August 21, 2017, revised September 14, 2017

On June 19, 2017, I started a series of timelines that will outline the history of the world which I have constructed and which conforms to the chronology of the Bible. This series will be interspersed among blogs on other subjects and will follow the structure in the table below.

                                                       GENERIC TIMELINES
Timeline 0 – Creation Week (3977 BC)
Timeline 1 – Edenic Era (3977 BC)
Timeline 2 – Antediluvian Era (3977-2321 BC)
Timeline 3A – Postdiluvian Era’s early phase 3A (2321-1870 BC)
Timeline 3B – Postdiluvian Era’s late phase 3B (1870-1464 BC)
Timeline 4A – Turbulent Era’s early phase 4A (1464-1008 BC)
Timeline 4B – Turbulent Era’s middle phase 4B (1008-754 BC)
Timeline 4C – Turbulent Era’s late phase 4C (754-665 BC)
Timeline 5A – Early Historic Era (665-2 BC)’s part 5A (Occident)
Timeline 5B – Early Historic Era (665-2 BC)’s part 5B (Middle East)
Timeline 5C – Early Historic Era (665-2 BC)’s part 5C (Orient)
Timeline 6A – Late Historic Era (2 BC-present)’s part 6A (Occident & Middle East)
Timeline 6B – Late Historic Era (2 BC-present)’s part 6B (Orient)

—ERA 3 – THE POSTDILUVIAN WORLD (2321-1464 BC)—
—Phase 3B of the Postdiluvian World (1870-1464 BC)—
—Period3B(1) – The Pre-Job Time (1870-1667 BC)—

China’s 1st Dynasty (C01) – The San-huang Wu Tui continued

Yao (C01-11) – He was also known as Yaotang-shi. He ruled China roughly 99 years (1954-1855 BC), the last 15 years (1870-1855 BC) of which fell in this period.[1] These 15 years were taken up entirely by attempts to control the flooding. After some hesitation, Yao appointed Gun to design and implement a system of dams and dikes to contain the mountain reservoirs. After 9 years of work, the flooding was still out of control. Yau then appointed Shun as co-emperor to reorganize the imperial administration and oversee further efforts by Gun. After another 4 years of work by Gun, the flooding was still out of control, and Yao abdicated the throne, leaving Shun as sole ruler.

Shun (C01-12) – He was also known as Youyu-shi. He reigned China for roughly 50 years (1855-1805 BC). His first project was the reform of the calendar, which had been rendered obsolete by the cataclysm. He then toured the country to view the flooding situation first hand. Dissatisfied with the results of Gun’s work, he banished Gun to Feather Mountain and appointed Gun’s son Yu to succeed him. Yu decided to try controlling the flood waters with drainage systems rather than dams and dikes. He described his work as follows: “The inundating waters seemed to assail the heavens, and in their extent embraced the hills and overtopped the great mounds, so that the people were bewildered and overwhelmed…. I opened passages for the streams throughout the nine provinces and conducted them to the seas. I deepened the channels and conducted them to the streams.” Meanwhile, Shun reorganized the state into districts each of which surrounded a high mountain, on which was situated the district’s administrative center. The prime objectives of this administrative system were drainage and agricultural development.

The 1st Abraham Threat occurred in 1819 BC, possibly when the orbits of the earth and the comet Venus nearly intersected.

China’s 2nd Dynasty (C02) – The Xia Dynasty

The Xia Dynasty, lasted for 341 years (1805-1464 BC), the first 138 years (1805-1667 BC) of which fell in this period. I have no idea how long each of them reigned. I am assigning an average of 27.6 years (138 years ÷ 5 rulers) to each of them in order to get each of them close to the time within the period when they actually reigned.

Yu (C02-01) – He was also known as Da Yu, meaning “Yu the Great.” He succeeded Shun on the throne and established the Xia Dynasty. He ruled China for roughly 28 years (1805-1777 BC). He institutedthe system of dynastic succession through primogenitor.

Qi  of Xia (C02-02), meaning “Son of Yu” – He ruled China for roughly 27 years (1777-1750 BC).

The 1st Isaac Threat occurred in 1769 BC, possibly when the orbits of the earth and the comet Venus nearly intersected.

Tai Kang (C02-03) – He ruled China for roughly 28 years (1750-1722 BC).

Yhong Kang (C02-04) – He ruled China for roughly 27 years (1722-1695 BC).

The 2nd Isaac Threat occurred in 1718 BC, possibly when the orbits of the earth and the comet Venus nearly intersected.

Xiang (C02-05) – He ruled China for roughly 28 years (1693-1667 BC).

The Job Disturbance occurred in 1667 BC, probably when the orbits of the earth and the comet Venus nearly intersected. Raining fire, hurricane winds, and earthquakes killed Job’s children.

— Period 3B(2) – The Post-Job Time (1667-1464 BC)—

Hiatus in leadership – It lasted approximately 9 years (1667-1656 BC). It was undoubtedly due to disorder following the catastrophe of 1667 BC. The Xia Dynasty then continued. There is no indication of its duration; I picked 9 years as a reasonable figure.

After the hiatus in leadership, the rule of the remaining 12 emperors of the Xia Dynasty continued for 192 years (1656-1464 BC). The average length of their reigns was 16 years (192 years ÷ 12 rulers).

Shao Kang (C02-06) – He ruled China for roughly 16 years (1656-1640 BC).

Zhu (C02-07) – He ruled China for roughly 16 years (1640-1624 BC).

The Joseph Threat occurred in 1616 BC, possibly when the orbits of the earth and the comet Venus nearly intersected.

Huai (C02-08) – He ruled China for roughly 16 years (1624-1608 BC).

Mang (C02-09) – He ruled China for roughly 16 years (1608-1592 BC)

Xie (C02-10) – He ruled China for roughly 16 years (1592-1576 BC).

Jiang (C02-11) – He ruled China for roughly 16 years (1576-1560 BC).

The 1st Hiatus[2] Threat occurred in 1566 BC, possibly when the orbits of the earth and the comet Venus nearly intersected.

Jiong (C02-12) – He ruled China for roughly 16 years (1560-1544 BC).

Yin Jia (C02-13) – He was also known as Jin. – He ruled China for roughly 16 years (1544-1528 BC).

The 2nd Hiatus Threat occurred in 1515 BC, possibly when the orbits of the earth and the comet Venus nearly intersected.

Kong Jia (C02-14) – He ruled China for roughly 16 years (1528-1512 BC).

Gao (C02-15) – He ruled China for roughly 16 years (1512-1496).

Fa (C02-16) – He ruled China for roughly 16 years (1496-1480 BC).

Lu Gui (C02-17) – He was also known as Jie. He ruled China for roughly 16 years (1480-1464 BC). His reign ended in the Battle of Mingtiao.

The Moses Disturbance occurred in 1464 BC, when the orbits of the earth and the comet Venus intersected. As the comet approached the earth, it was on its way from perihelion. Being repelled by the sun, its tail therefore preceded it. The earth’s immersion in the tail produced the Ten Plagues of Egypt, which laid waste to the land and precipitated the Exodus of the Hebrews. The subsequent close encounters between the earth and the comet produced volcanism, hurricane winds, torrential rains, falling naphtha, electrical discharges, earthquakes, tectonic upheavals and subsidences, tsunamis, and darkness across the entire globe. All forms of terrestrial life were devastated.

© 2017 John Holbrook Jr.
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[1] In 1870 BC, about 15 years prior to his abdication, China experienced a cataclysm. Thus, Yao’s reign was divided into (a) his pre-cataclysm period, which lasted 84 years (1954-1870 BC), and (b) his post-cataclysm period, which lasted 15 years (1870-1855 BC).

[2] Refers to the hiatus in Hebrew leadership during their Oppression in Egypt (1579-1464 BC).

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