Timeline 3A – Chinese in the Postdiluvian Era’s early phase

by John Holbrook Jr.
A Biblical View, posted July 31, 2017, revised September 14, 2017

On June 19, 2017, I started a series of timelines that will outline the history of the world which I have constructed and which conforms to the chronology of the Bible. This series will be interspersed among blogs on other subjects and will follow the structure in the table below.

                                              GENERIC TIMELINES
Timeline 0 – Creation Week (3977 BC)
Timeline 1 – Edenic Era (3977 BC)
Timeline 2 – Antediluvian Era (3977-2321 BC)
Timeline 3A – Postdiluvian Era’s early phase 3A (2321-1870 BC)
Timeline 3B – Postdiluvian Era’s late phase 3B (1870-1464 BC)
Timeline 4A – Turbulent Era’s early phase 4A (1464-1008 BC)
Timeline 4B – Turbulent Era’s middle phase 4B (1008-754 BC)
Timeline 4C – Turbulent Era’s late phase 4C (754-665 BC)
Timeline 5A – Early Historic Era (665-2 BC)’s part 5A (Occident)
Timeline 5B – Early Historic Era (665-2 BC)’s part 5B (Middle East)
Timeline 5C – Early Historic Era (665-2 BC)’s part 5C (Orient)
Timeline 6A – Late Historic Era (2 BC-present)’s part 6A (Occident & Middle East)
Timeline 6B – Late Historic Era (2 BC-present)’s part 6B (Orient)

—ERA 3 – THE POSTDILUVIAN WORLD (2321-1464 BC)—
—Phase 3A of the Postdiluvian World (2321-1464 BC)—
—Period 3A(1) – Initial Settlement & Migrations (2321-2221 BC)—

China’s 1st Dynasty (C01) – The San-huang Wu Tui

The four emperors of the San-huang Wu Tui during this period were Nuwa (C01-01), Youchao (C01-02), Suiren (C01-03), and Fu Xi (C01-04).

The first three men probably were not rulers. First, all three were given fantastic ages. Second, Noah and his sons probably remained in the initial settlement in eastern Tadzikistan. Their appearance in the king lists of China, however, is not surprising. All of the Ark’s passengers would have been revered by all peoples, regardless of where they were, and the Chinese people included the names of these legendary figures in their historical records to preserve the memory of their origins. Thus, I surmise that they were included in the list in order to trace China’s royal line back to mankind’s new progenitor, Noah.

If I am right here, the leader of the migration into China was probably the fourth emperor Fu Xi, a grandson or great-grandson of Noah. As in Mesopotamia, he probably did not arrive in China until roughly 70 years after the Flood in 2321 BC – i.e. 2251 BC.

Thus there appears to be two benchmarks here: (1) the start of  Fu Xi’s reign c. 2251 BC and (2) the cataclysm that occurred roughly 15 years prior to the end of Yao’s reign. Regarding this cataclysm, Velikovsky wrote that an immense catastrophe struck China and separated (a) its almost obliterated and somewhat legendary past and (b) the succeeding, semi-historical period. The sun did not set for ten days. The forests were ignited and burned. The heat brought forth multitudes of vicious vermin. An immense wave “that reached the sky” fell on the high mountains and buried the lowlands completely. The waters were caught in the valleys between the mountains, and their outflow produced a continuing flood in the lowlands that lasted for decades. Apparently the cataclysm also rendered the previous calendar obsolete.

The identity of the cataclysm that occurred in Yao’s day, however, is not easy to determine. There are two main possibilities:

The Abraham Disturbance in 1870 BC [1] which terminated Phase 3A – The Early Postdiluvian World (=the Silver Age of the Ancients) might also have caused the flood in China.[2] Pro this possibility: The last nine rulers of the San-huang Wu Tuiwould fit quite comfortably into Phase 3A-The Early Postdiluvian World (=the Silver Age). Omitting the first three rulers, the length of time from the beginning of Fu Xi’s reign in 2251 BC to the beginning of Yao’s reign in 1954 BC was 297 years. That results in an average reign of 42.43 years (297 years ÷ 7 rulers) – a reasonable possibility during an era of unusual longevity in human ages. Con this possibility: The consequences of the cataclysm would have been quite different in different areas – explosions and tectonic upheavals in the Middle East and flooding waters in the Far East, although the former would have spawned enormous tsunamis in the world’s oceans.

The Moses Disturbance in 1464 BC[3] which terminated Phase 3B-The Late Postdiluvian World (=the Bronze Age of the Ancients) might also have caused the flood in China. Pro this possibility: The consequences of the cataclysm in Yao’s day are similar or reciprocal to the consequences of the cataclysm in Moses’s day and thus led Velikovsky to identify it as such. The ten-day period of light in the Far East correlates with the extended period of darkness in the Middle East. The ignition and burning of the forests happened in both places. Titanic waves and flooding occurred in both places. Also, the rendering of the calendar obsolete also occurred in both places. Con this possibility: The fourth through twelfth rulers of the San-huang Wu Tui[4] would have reigned for about 787 years (2251-1464 BC), and the average length of their reigns would have 87 years – still reasonable possibilities during an era of unusual longevity in human ages – but the chronologist would be left with the question of how to fit the Zia Dynasty (C02), the Shang Dynasty (C03), and the Zhou Dynasty (C04) into the next 799 years.

I opt for identifying the cataclysm in Yao’s day with Abraham Disturbance in 1870 BC, which terminated the Early Postdiluvian World (=the Silver Age of the Ancients). Thus, the sole emperor of the San-huang Wu Tui during this period was:

Fu Xi (C01-04) – He ruled China for roughly 42 years (2251-2209 BC), the first 30 years (2251-2221 BC) of which fell in this period

 The Peleg Disturbance occurred in 2221 BC, possibly when the orbits of the earth and the comet Venus nearly intersected. Probably a tectonic upheaval broke up the earth’s single land mass (Pangrea) into the continents and major islands that exist today – an event which the Hebrews called “the Division of the Land.”

 —Period 3A(2) – Rise of Babylon (2221-2070 BC)—

 China’s 1st Dynasty (C01) continued

The emperors of the San-huang Wu Tui continued throughout this period. I have no idea how long each of them reigned. I am assigning an average of 42-43 years to each of them in order to get each of them close to the time within the period when they actually reigned.

Fu Xi (C01-04) – He ruled roughly 42 years (2251-2166 BC), the last 12 years (2221-2209 BC) of which fell in this period.

Yan Emperor (C01-05) – He was also known as Shennong. He ruled China for roughly 43 years (2209-2166 BC).

Yellow Emperor (C01-06) – He was also known as Gongsun Xuanyuan. He ruled China for roughly 42 years (2166-2124 BC).

Shaohao (C01-07) – He was also known as Jin Tian. He ruled China for roughly 43 years (2124-2081 BC).

Zhuanxu (C01-08) – He was also known as Gaoyang. He ruled China for roughly 42 years (2081-2039 BC), the first 11 years (2081-2070 BC) of which fell in this period.

The Terah Disturbance occurred in 2070 BC, possibly when the orbits of the earth and the comet Venus nearly intersected. Probably a titanic electric discharge between the two bodies confounded the Babylonians – or possibly all of mankind’s – ability to communicate in a single language, destroyed the Tower of Babel, and devastated much of the surrounding region.

— Period A(3) – Rise of Civilizations (2070-1870 BC)—

China’s 1st Dynasty (C01) continued

The emperors of the San-huang Wu Tui continued to rule China throughout this period. I have no idea how long each of them reigned. I am assigning an average of 42/43 years to each of them in order to get each of them close to the time within the period when they actually reigned.

 Zhuanxu (C01-08) – He was also known as Gaoyang. He ruled China for roughly 42 years (2081-2039 BC), the last 31 years (2070-2039 BC) of which fell in this period.

Ku (C01-09) – He was also known as Gaoxin. He ruled China for roughly 43 years (2039-1996 BC).

The 1st Terah Threat occurred in 2020 BC, possibly when the orbits of the comet Venus and the earth nearly intersected.

Zhi (C01-10) – He was also known as Qingwang-shi. He ruled China for roughly 42 years (1996-1954 BC).

The 2nd Terah Threat occurred in 1970 BC, possibly when the orbits of the comet Venus and the earth nearly intersected.

The 3rd Terah Threat occurred in 1920 BC, possibly when the orbits of the comet Venus and the earth nearly intersected.

Yao (C01-11) – He was also known as Yaotang-shi. He ruled China for roughly 99 years (1954-1855 BC). During his reign, China experienced a cataclysm about 15 years prior to his abdication. Thus, Yao’s reign was divided into (a) his pre-cataclysm period, which lasted 84 years (1954-1870 BC), and (b) his post-cataclysm period, which lasted 15 years (1870-1855 BC).  

The Abraham Disturbance occurred 1870 BC, possibly when the orbits of the earth and the comet Venus nearly intersected and a titanic electric discharge between the two bodies destroyed Sodom and Gomorrah and much of the surrounding region and a titanic earthquake created the Great African Rift or its greater expansion, thereby eliminating the Vale of Siddim and creating the Dead Sea.

© 2017 John Holbrook Jr.
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[1] This cataclysm destroyed the cities of Sodom and Gomorrah and the Vale of Siddim in the Middle East and caused the Great African Rift or its greater expansion.

[2] The worst of the global cataclysms produced tsunamis that rolled inland. In eastern Asia, the waters may have been trapped in large basins in the Chinese and Mongolian highlands and taken decades to pour out through the Chinese lowlands.

[3] This cataclysm terminated the Middle Kingdom of Egypt and precipitated the Exodus of the Jews.

[4] These nine rulers were Fu Xi (C01-04), Yan Emperor or Shennong (C01-05), Yellow Emperor or Gongsun Xuanyuan (C01-06), (d) Shaohao or Jin Tian (C01-07), Zhuanxu or Gaoyang) (C01-08), Ku or Gaoxin (C01-09), Zhi or Qingwang-shi (C01-10), and Yao or Yaotang-shi (C01-12).

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